1. “Mad” King Ludwig of Bavaria, The Drowned Swan King, von Frz. Werner, Munich, Cabinet Card, 1886

    King Ludwig II of Bavaria (1845-1886) was noted for his bizarre behavior, attributed perhaps, to syphilis. He drowned under mysterious circumstances in Lake Starnberg, three days after being declared legally insane. Ludwig Friedrich Wilhelm’s extravagances ranged from his obsession with swans, the building of fairy-tale style castles, his latent homosexuality and his relationship and patronage to composer Richard Wagner. His excessive behavior kept him in the public eye. It earned him many nicknames, including “Mad Ludwig,” “The Swan King,” as well as “The Dream King.” His unusually designed anachronistic castles, such as Neuschwanstein, are now important Bavarian tourist attractions. The castles were inspired by Wagner’s operas. Most postmortem photographs of European leaders and nobility are simple dignified compositions. However, this postmortem image of King Ludwig II, with his casket surrounded by candles, was perhaps inspired by his love of Wagnerian opera. He is depicted as a quintessential Wagnerian hero returning as a warrior to his maker.

    From Sleeping Beauty II - Grief, Bereavement and the Family in Memorial Photography by Stanley B. Burns, M.D.

     

  2. Friendly

    (via thisgameisaplateaux)

     

  3. Une couleur madame, une couleur monsieur,

    Une aux seins, une aux cheveux,

               La bouche des passions

               Et si vous voyez rouge

    La plus belle est à vos genoux.

    Paul Eluard, Capitale de la douleur -Les petits justes IV-

    (via savethismemoryagain)

     


  4. "A man reserves his true and deepest love not for the species of woman in whose company he finds himself electrified and enkindled, but for that one in whose company he may feel tenderly drowsy."
    — George Jean Nathan

    (Source: holdentumbrl, via holdentumbrl)

     

  5. Bartolomeo Veneto, Portrait of a Man, Italy, c. 1530

    (Source: nickkahler)

     

  6. View of Umbrella Rock, Lookout Mountain

    Chattanooga, Tennessee (vicinity), 1864

    [From the Library of Congress]

    (Source: liquidnight)

     

  7. Robert Doisneau

    Monsieur Beauvoir, 1950

    From Paris

    (Source: liquidnight)

     

  8. View of Umbrella Rock, Lookout Mountain

    Chattanooga, Tennessee (vicinity), 1864

    [From the Library of Congress]

    (Source: liquidnight)

     

  9. (Source: colour-me-curious, via gh2u)